My Heart Overfloweth

My Heart Overfloweth

Today is Valentine’s Day, and I’m thinking of all the people I love. I start with my family–my husband Bill, my adult children Kitty and Will, and all the parents, brothers, sisters, in-laws, cousins and extended family who have surrounded us. While today is spun as a romantic holiday, I prefer to think of Valentine’s Day as a time to contemplate, celebrate and communicate about love with all the people in our lives.

Last night my heart overfloweth as I watched my friend and fellow speaker Steve Beck volunteer his time as one of our guest faculty at the National Speakers Association of Illinois (NSA-IL)’s Speakers Academy. Steve is one of many NSA-IL members who have so generously donated their time and talent to share about the experience of being a professional speaker with students in our Speakers Academy, a training program for aspiring speakers. But perhaps because Steve was my Co-Dean in the program for several years, or because he now serves as our chapter president, or maybe just because Steve is Steve, I was moved to tears by his contribution.

Steve shared about losing his brother in Vietnam when Steve was 15. He said that before his brother left for Vietnam, his mother promised to pray for his brother every day–a ridiculous promise, he thought. Steve remembered coming home as a young teenager to see his mother praying the rosary and asking him to join her. Reluctantly, he did. Now as an adult, and as a successful business man and professional speaker, Steve uses prayer to jump start his day. Prayer, meditation and affirmations are part of his morning ritual, as much a requirement as his first cup of coffee. He shared his own “12-step program” with us, a list of daily affirmations, and he encouraged us to write some of our own in the handout he shared. Oh, and another thing–he makes his bed every day. Every. Day.

Steve Beck Leave Your Funk at the DoorIt’s no surprise that Steve has written a series of books, the first of which was entitled How to Have a Great Day Every Day, followed by Leave Your Funk at the Door. These irrepressible titles reflect the message Steve had for our Speakers Academy participants, a message that aligns so perfectly with Valentine’s Day: it’s up to us to discover every day the miracles we have in our lives. And most of those miracles have something to do with the people we love. No, let me rephrase that: those miracles have EVERYTHING to do with the people we love.

Steve, I love you, man. You bring a new energy to our NSA-IL chapter that nurtures and sustains us, an enthusiasm that’s helping our speaker community grow, attracted by love. The many lives you’ve touched as President, Co-Dean and now as guest faculty for our Speakers Academy program, are too numerous to mention. Happy Valentine’s Day, my friend.

 

[Masthead photo: “Arizona Valentine, A Heart of Ten Roses,” 2011, oil on canvas by artist Dyana Hesson, Mesa, AZ; taken at Sky Harbor Airport, Phoenix, AZ]

Why Volunteer?

Why Volunteer?

This morning I’m rubbing the sleep from my eyes, trying to wake up after spending the afternoon and a late evening in the city of Chicago. Last night we kicked off the first of six sessions for NSA-IL Speakers Academy (see photo, above, of our March 2013 graduating class with Mikki Williams, CSP, CPAE, center).

This is the third year I’ve participated as a “Dean” of the program, along with my “Co-Dean” Steve Beck, an irrepressible speaker, trainer and leader. Steve is also this year’s president of our state chapter, National Speakers Association of Illinois. For both of us, leading NSA-IL Speakers Academy (formerly known as Speaker University) is a labor of love. Thinking about all the work that’s required to organize and administer this program, along with a recent conversation I had with a friend who is considering joining the Wheaton Chamber of Commerce, has me thinking. Why volunteer?

First, let’s look at the incongruity of volunteering. When you volunteer, you aren’t getting paid. And for those of us who are entrepreneurs and who don’t get a regular paycheck, that’s a pretty big trade-off of billable hours. For those who are employed, it’s time away from the office which brings its own risk. You may or may not get accolades or visibility; you may or may not get “credit.”

Yet according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, about 64.5 million people in the United States volunteered through or for an organization at least once between September 2011 and September 2012. The Corporation for National and Community Service has a boatload of statistics, research and reports on the benefits of volunteering, including data that demonstrates people who volunteer are healthier and live longer. And if you look around you, you’ll see that really successful people always have some aspect of their lives dedicated to volunteering, whether it’s through their professional associations, their organizations of faith or their communities. As a business and career coach, I believe that volunteering is not only the right thing to do, it’s the smart thing to do. Here are just a few reasons to volunteer:

  • Being a volunteer puts you immediately in community with others. Our business and career success is dependent on being part of a larger community. Whether you’re a member of your local Chamber of Commerce or your professional association, you have a chance to build relationships with others. And we know that people like to work with and do business with people they know and trust. Volunteering gives you a chance to earn that trust.
  • Volunteering is like an audition. When you’re leading a committee, you get to flex your leadership muscles. As you work together with others on a project, you demonstrate teamwork. You have a stage on which to hone your presentation skills. People are observing you and believe me, they notice. Are you kind to others? Do you show respect? Do you have a sense of humor and not take yourself too seriously? Do you show up on time? Do you do what you said you’d do? In essence, are you “count-on-able?”
  • You get to practice. Volunteering is a great way to build a new skill set. If you’re in marketing, try working on the finance committee. If you’re in finance, join the strategic planning committee. Experiment and volunteer for things outside your “wheelhouse.”
  • Without getting too corny (although I think all good things in life are corny), being a volunteer allows you to leave a legacy. I am amazed at the depth and breadth of people’s commitment to their professional associations, their alumni associations, their churches or their service clubs. People devote countless hours to ensure that the missions of the organizations they support continue to thrive long after they’re gone.

I love being part of NSA-IL Speakers Academy because we’re helping other aspiring speakers reach their goals. I have a chance to share what I know, to lead from a curriculum developed by a dedicated task force of NSA members across the country, and to contribute to a profession that changes the world. One of our core values is continuous learning, and my commitment as a “Dean” allows me to learn as well. And I don’t mind admitting that I relish receiving “love letters” and acknowledgement from our participants and graduates who appreciate our devotion to them.

Over the course of my 16 years as a coach, I’ve heard one consistent theme from the folks who seek my services: they want to make a difference. Being a volunteer for an organization that resonates with you, your heart and your mission allows you to make a difference. Do it because you don’t need the money and you don’t care who gets the credit. But don’t be surprised when you get an amazing return on that investment–a job offer, a contract, a client. That’s the paradox of giving first.